SERVICES

SERVICES

 Procedural Justice Training

How can police executives move from procedural justice being just the chief’s idea to the organization’s core value? From a professional buzzword to the organizational culture?

The Center for Public Safety and Justice has created a unique law enforcement training model that contains specific curricula, workshops, and supplemental materials not only for all levels of law enforcement and the communities to which they belong. The four-part procedural justice training series involves four distinct training components linked together by a common objective: increasing police legitimacy in the eyes of the public and organizational legitimacy in the eyes of agency employees.

Courses are facilitated by highly qualified two-person teams, bringing the perspective of executive level law enforcement and an allied professional.

The Executive Commitment

The first essential step in changing the culture of an organization lies in ensuring the chief executive is bought into both the change and the process by which to achieve it. CPSJ begins every training relationship with a “Conversation with the Chief” to assess readiness and ensure buy-in to the tenants of the training at the highest levels of the organization. Commitment, demonstrated at the top, is necessary for the adoption of the training throughout the department.

Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement Agencies:

Executive Seminar

The Executive Seminar is a three-hour strategy seminar for police executives and command staff. The seminar provides the chief and his executive team an overview of the philosophy of procedural justice; opportunity to participate in interactive exercises and to explore their roles in furthering the pillars of procedural justice in organizational practice. The Executive Seminar lays the foundation for a successful training initiative by helping senior level staff conceptualize and operationalize procedural justice in their department. The Executive Seminar can be offered in conjunction with the Procedural Justice Training-of-Trainers or tailored to an agency in the sequence of the procedural justice training series. For more information, click here!

 

Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement Agencies:

Organizational Change Through Decision Making and Policy

The next step in the procedural justice training series is to train all supervisory staff – both civilian and sworn – through the courses titled: Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement: Organizational Change through Decision Making and Policy. The course focuses primarily on developing internal procedural justice to best serve an organizational commitment to external procedural justice. Because the executive and command staff have already begun the process, supervisors can rest assured that their own bosses have committed to upholding the norms and values they are asked to exhibit and reinforce with those they supervise.

The eight-hour course is instructed by a highly qualified two-person team bringing the perspective of executive level law enforcement and an allied profession. It introduces sworn and civilian supervisors to the philosophy of procedural justice and provides practical steps for its internal implementation. By creating an environment in which supervisors understand their own roles in culture change and are empowered to cultivate these traits in those they supervise, a solid foundation is laid for front-line officers to put into practice what they learn in the procedural justice training tailored specifically for them. For more information, click here!

Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement: Front-Line Officers

Only after executive, command, and supervisory staff are trained, do front-line officers go through the training. So, by the time front-line staff has received training, they should be seeing and feeling the impact of the pillars of procedural justice in their work lives. Research and practice have shown that front-line staff are more likely to accept and apply a change in practice in their day-to-day work when those same changes are valued and practiced by those around them. In other words, internal and external procedural justice are linked.

The Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement: Front-line Officer eight-hour training is tailored to the specific experience of front-line officers. Through research and examples, front-line staff are shown the benefits of procedural justice in their daily interactions with the public. Voluntary compliance, the view of the law as legitimate, and an emphasis of the benefits of positive, social contacts are all stressed as part of a change in practice that promotes officer safety.  An additional resource to the front-line course is a complimentary six-part rollcall training that reinforcing the tenants in an ongoing manner after the classroom section is complete to continually engage front-line staff with the principles of procedural justice. For more information, click here!

 

Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement Agencies:

Community Workshop–Dialogues to Change Workshop #1 Building Trust 

After the agency has been trained and is striving to achieve the goals found in the procedural justice philosophy, a joint workshop is hosted with the agency and the community. Procedural Justice for Communities: A Dialogues-to-Change Workshop #1 Building Trust brings the core tenants of the procedural justice training series to the community. Here participating residents can explore the key concepts of the procedural justice curricula with trained officers in a non-confrontational setting.

This three and a half hour Dialogues-to-Change Workshop #1 Building Trust model uses participatory leadership to engage community in a values-based facilitation style which works to shrink power dynamics and create space for open dialogue. The facilitators create an environment which provides an opportunity for mutual learning – law enforcement and community members learning from each other. The ultimate goal is to develop a better understanding and perspective of each other, lay the foundation for building mutual trust, increase the community’s perspective of police legitimacy and lessen the “Us vs. Them” attitude.

This fourth and final component is modeled by CPSJ’s outside facilitators. Agencies are then encouraged to continue convening additional community Dialogues to Change based on Key Issues established during the initial Building Trust workshop. For more information, click here!

Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement Supervisors and Front-line:

Training of Trainers

This three-day training enables internal training teams to effectively deliver two of the eight-hour procedural justice courses in the training series; Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement: Organizational Change through Decision Making and Policy and Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement: Front-line Officer. This will aid in continuing to institutionalize procedural justice into the core of the organization by providing the resources for agencies – in particular large agencies – to train all employees over an extended period of time, train new employees who join the organization post initial organizational training or aid as a continued education for employees to daily actualizing procedural justice. For more information, click here!

 

The four-part procedural justice training series supports long-term institutionalization of procedural justice.

 


Other Trainings, Workshops and Services

Community Policing

Coffee with a Cop

Cyber Security

Household Pets and Service Animals in Disasters

Conflict Resolution and Negotiation Skills

World Cafes

Curriculum Development

Agency Assessments

Restorative Justice/Peace Circles

 


Speaker’s Bureau

Staff of the Center for Public Safety and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago has been recognized on national and international levels as subject matter experts on procedural justice and topics related to building trust both internal and external to the organization. Team members are available for media appearances, retreat and conference workshops, and other events.